Go Forth And Make Honey

 

Once you get used to eating your own honey there’s no going back. You might have few jars of equally flavorful honey from the farmers market or the beekeeper down the road, but you’ll almost always eat that last. It’s not that my honey tastes better than anything else out there. Besides the taste, you also have to consider what it takes to to get honey into your jar in the first place. Setting up a new hive, feeding the bees when necessary so they don’t starve or fly away, opening the hives to check their health, getting stung, watching them pollinate your garden or sitting in front of the hives to watch them work…you wind up tasting all of these things in your own honey.

And although there’s plenty of honey stashed away in various cabinets throughout the house, the sight of an empty jar on the table makes you realize that the stash won’t last forever. It’s time once again to check on the bees.

So far it’s been a warm spring and as usual, the first things in bloom are four large flowering cherry trees in the lower pasture; they should be crawling with bees by this point.

Every flower is getting some action as the bees dive in to take advantage of the early food source. When their legs get too heavy with pollen they fly back to the hive to drop it off, only to return for more.

It’s too early to tell if we’ll be able to enjoy the fruits of their labor later this summer (as long as they don’t fly away to a hollow tree somewhere) but for now it looks as if there will be more honey in my future.

 

 

 

 

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